PTSD

Over 5 million people in the United States suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome.

PTSD is an anxiety disorder that happens after traumatic event.

When someone experiences a traumatic event they experience PTSD. A person who is attacked will be afraid to go outside and go anywhere alone.

PTSD occurs generally when people relive the event, try to forget the event, or have anxiety related to the event. This anxiety can be court, seeing the perpetrator, seeing the place or just old fashion memory.

The scariest thing is when you have flashbacks.It is just as it sounds a flash back to that time except you can’t leave your trapped in a memory you can not control or exit. Your imprisoned in the most traumatic moment inside your mind. They come and go as they wish and last for what feels like forever.

PTSD has been thought to be only combat related. That myth is False.PTSD can be any  traumatic event such as:

  • natural disaster
  • car crash
  • sexual or physical assault
  • combat
  • witnessing a traumatic event such as shooting
  • shooting someone in line of duty or self defense
  • Terrorist attack or mugging
  • seeing your child hurt without power to protect

Symptoms of PTSD vary from person to person but the common ones are as listed:

  • Having recurrent nightmares
  • flashback
  • Increase in your heart rate or sweating when reminded of the traumatic event
  • Struggle to sleep and stay asleep
  • irritated or outbursts of anger
  • on guard or alert waiting for danger
  • failure to deal with event in any way
  • Self isolation
  • Negative feelings about everything

Getting treatment is very important because further trauma can increase feelings. Therapy, meditation, support group and sometimes medication can minimize feelings as you deal with them. 

 

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How to survive Domestic Violence

It may sound difficult at first, but you can reclaim your life from your abuser and move on with freedom. Here we help you think how to leave the abusive situation while protecting yourself from more abuse.

Realize that you are important. Stop believing what your abuser has been telling you about yourself. You are worthy!

Talk to someone that understands~seek an advocate or support group.

Be kind to yourself, you will feel like back peddling, this is your low-self esteem trying to save itself~You have been insulted and hurt for long time work on feeling worthy and self esteem.

You will feel really deep anger at his/her violence at one point~it means you are getting stronger. Work through your feelings.

There is always someone out there that is worried about you, even if your abuser says no(they always do).

Get your strength and believe, take back what is yours~ your future without violence.

Don’t believe your abuser if they tell you nobody will ever love you as much as they do. Love is not violent.

Leaving can be a very dangerous time. If you decide to leave, talk to a counselor who understands domestic violence ask for tips for doing this in a safe way. Ask about safety planning tips.

After your abuser is gone change all locks immediately and program your phone for the police.

Document everything for any future court dates, but keep in safe place.

Have all documents in safe place such as birth certificates, police reports,doctor reports,court papers, and photos.

Remember, it’s not your fault! No one ever deserves abuse!

 

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One Response to How to survive Domestic Violence

  1. hey. you have a pretty good post there mate.

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Cutting~Self injury

Cutting is the act of intentionally inflicting harm on oneself. Cutting isn’t a suicide attempt, though it may look and seem that way. Cutting is a form of what is known as self-injury or non-suicidal self-injury. Other types of self-injury include scratching, burning, ripping or pulling skin or hair, swallowing toxic substances, self-bruising, and breaking bones. While cutting may occur on any part of the body, it is most common on the hands, wrists, stomach, and thighs.

Self-injury is an unhealthy way to cope with emotional distress. Some people cut themselves when they feel overwhelming sadness, anxiety, or emotional numbness. Others do it to feel in control or relieve stress. A few see it as a way to cleanse their bodies. Girls tend to cut themselves more than boys do, although cutting can happen with anyone.

Cutting is frequently linked to childhood abuse (especially sexual abuse), depression, anxiety, eating disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, and substance abuse problems.

Cutting starts between 12 and 15

Warning signs:

  • Unexplained burns, cuts, bruising, scars, healing or healed wounds, or similar markings on the skin—small, linear cuts are especially common
  • Implausible stories that may explain one, but not all, physical injuries
  • Consistently wearing long sleeves or pants, even when it’s hot outside
  • Constantly wearing wristbands, large watchbands, or large bracelets
  • Frequent bandages or other methods of covering wounds
  • Odd or unexplainable paraphernalia, such as razor blades or needles
  • Unwillingness to participate in activities that expose the body, such as swimming.

Here are some suggestions:

• Learn about self-injury.

•  Don’t ignore it.

Approach your friend in a compassionate way.

• Be there.

• Encourage them to get help.

• Call the counseling center yourself

• If it’s an emergency, get help

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One Response to Cutting~Self injury

  1. very good publish, i certainly love this website, carry on it.

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Suicide is not the answer

  1. Today 12 children will commit suicide

Suicide is the 3rd largest cause of death(1st being accidents and 2nd homocide)

One suicide occurs every 16 minutes

More males commit suicide than females

It is 2nd leading cause of death for college students

If you know someone who displays several signs  below seek help:

  1.          Appearing depressed or sad most of the time.         
  2.          Talking or writing about death or suicide
  3.          Feeling hopeless.

     

  4.          

    Feeling helpless.

          

     

  5.          Feeling strong anger or rage.
  6.          Feeling trapped — like there is no way out of a situation.
  7.          Experiencing dramatic mood changes.
  8.          Abusing drugs or alcohol

      

     

  9.          Exhibiting a change in personality.
  10.          Acting impulsively.
  11.          Losing interest in most activities.
  12.          Experiencing a change in sleeping habits.
  13.          Experiencing a change in eating habits.
  14.          Losing interest in most activities.
  15.          Performing poorly at work or in school.
  16.          Giving away prized possessions.
  17.          Writing a will.
  18.          Feeling excessive guilt or shame.
  19.          Acting recklessly.
  20.         Talking about death
  21.         Increased use of alcohol or drugs
  22.         Talking about life being unbearable
  23.         Talking about how to die
  24.         Talking about being burden
  25.         If they say they want to die, take it serious as it is cry for help. Next time it may not be!

 Organizations that help with suicide prevention:

75% of children who commit suicide display warnings, the rest do not

Suicide is NEVER the answer,getting help is the answer.

If you or someone you know is in immediate danger
because of thoughts of suicide

Please call 911 now
If you are not in immediate danger because of thoughts of suicide, but need someone to talk with about your suicidal feelings, please do not hesitate to call one of the following national suicide prevention lines:

1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)

1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

                                     Suicide Prevention Lines

Source:suicide.org and voices amplified

 

 

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  1. mma odds says:

    Hello , you are awsome writer, i love voices-amplified.com

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Internet Safety Facts

Data and Statistics:

There are 80 million kids online today

There are more than 50,000 chat rooms available

75% of children are willing to share personal information online

There is 100% chance of meeting a stranger online

No one knows who the stranger on the other end is

10% of internet activity world wide is age group 2-11

18% of 8-10 year olds are on the internet daily

1 in 5 kids say they do and say  things online their parents would not approve of

Digital footprints left now follow them to college

 

What parents can do:

Talk to your kids and explain the rules of respect and responsibility

Teach them safety settings on fb and social sites

Know privacy settings

Limit what can be downloaded through your control panel

Ask them questions and check the history

Password protect your account

Limit computer time

Have computer in neutral area so can be somewhat monitored

Know who they have on their sites

Be aware of bullying and sexual harassment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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7 Responses to Internet Safety Facts

  1. You got a very fantastic website, Gladiola I found it through yahoo.

  2. Megan Carter says:

    Sweet web site, super design and style, real clean and use friendly.

  3. Good blog! I really love how it is easy on my eyes and the data are well written. I am wondering how I might be notified whenever a new post has been made. I have subscribed to your RSS feed which must do the trick! Have a nice day! “You can discover what your enemy fears most by observing the means he uses to frighten you.” by Eric Hoffer.

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Find us at:

Facebook :https://www.facebook.com/#!/voices.amplified

Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/201954669920482/

Facebook page please like us: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Voices-Amplified/321711657877136

Twitter: https://twitter.com/starbaby73

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Other websites: http://starmyers.weebly.com/index.html

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My books

My first book October 2012

My first book October 2012

Book is available at:http://www.lulu.com/shop/star-myers/the-searching-soul/paperback/product-18179255.html 

 Star Myers is a published author in the National Library for Poetry and earned the governors award for her writing. She writes some of the most beautiful poems known to mankind.

Star spent the last few years as a Survival and Child Abuse Host, Blog Talk Radio Executive Producer and Regional Director for Dreamcatchers for Abused Children.She is founder of Voices Amplified nonprofit 501c3 whose mission is to provide resourses and support while spreading awareness.She is child abuse advocate whose mission is to stop the suffering of children at the hands of their abusers.Awareness is the key to maintaining safety.Star is an author for the examiner and spends her nights writing the next big novel.
 

Star Myers has released her first book of poetry, “The Searching Soul.” Myers invites the reader into her world, as her writings deal with daily struggles and pain people face, they all resonate with spiritual strength and hope for the future that everyone can relate to. One comes away from reading this book feeling empowered.

face behind the mask

Paperback available at:http://www.lulu.com/shop/star-myers/the-face-behind-the-mask/paperback/product-18797816.html

Ebook :http://www.lulu.com/shop/star-myers/the-face-behind-the-mask/ebook/product-18819977.html

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Abuse Data and Statistics

Data & Statistics

Today up to 6 children will die from abuse

1 in 3 girls will be molested before the age of 18

1 in 6 boys will be molested before the age of 18

Every 10 seconds a child is raped, beaten or killed in the US

Globally, approximately 1 in 5 women and 1 in 10-20 men report being sexually abused as children.

For every report 2 go unreported

84% of prisoners were abused

8 out of 10 know their abuser

85% of runaways flee abuse

28% of children hurt are even investigated

In 2009, approximately 3.3 million child abuse reports and allegations were made involving an estimated 6 million children.

Only 28% of child abuse reports are investigated

63% of abuse is unsubstantiated because not enough evidence

Broken bones and bruises are not considered evidence enough to stop abuse

More than 740,000 children and youth are treated in hospital emergency departments as a result of violence each year—that’s more than 84 every hour.

The total lifetime cost of child maltreatment is $124 billion each year.
More than 3 million reports of child maltreatment are received by state and local agencies each year—that’s nearly 6 reports every minute.

Child sexual abuse happens in all racial, religious, ethnic and age groups, and at all socio-economic levels. Since children are abused in homes across the country, adults need to learn what makes children vulnerable, how to recognize warning signs of those who may be sexually abusing children and what to do if sexual abuse is suspected.85% of runaways are fleeing abusive homes when the system fails

Child abuse increases likelihood of arrest for violent crime by 38%

The typical child abuser molests 117 victims in their lifetime

There are 60 MILLION child sex abuse SURVIVORS among us

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One Response to Abuse Data and Statistics

  1. As a Newbie, I am permanently searching online for articles that can help me. Thank you

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Where to report abuse by state

Alabama Local (toll): (334) 242-9500
http://dhr.alabama.gov/services/Child_Protective_Services/Abuse_Neglect_Reporting.aspx

Alaska Toll-Free: (800) 478-4444
http://www.hss.state.ak.us/ocs/default.htm

Arizona Toll-Free: (888) SOS-CHILD (888-767-2445)
https://www.azdes.gov/dcyf/cps/reporting.asp

Arkansas Toll-Free: (800) 482-5964
http://www.arkansas.gov/reportARchildabuse/

California http://www.dss.cahwnet.gov/cdssweb/PG20.htm
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Colorado Local (toll): (303) 866-5932
http://www.cdhs.state.co.us/childwelfare/FAQ.htm
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Connecticut TDD: (800) 624-5518
Toll-Free: (800) 842-2288
http://www.state.ct.us/dcf/HOTLINE.htm

Delaware Toll-Free: (800) 292-9582
http://kids.delaware.gov/services/crisis.shtml

District of Columbia Local (toll): (202) 671-SAFE (202-671-7233)
http://cfsa.dc.gov/DC/CFSA/Support+the+Safety+Net/Report+Child+Abuse+and+Neglect

Florida Toll-Free: (800) 96-ABUSE (800-962-2873)
http://www.dcf.state.fl.us/abuse/

Georgia http://dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov/portal/site/DHR-DFCS/menuitem.5d32235bb09bde9a50c8798dd03036a0/?vgnextoid=733a2b48d9a4ff00VgnVCM100000bf01010aRCRD
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Hawaii Local (toll): (808) 832-5300
http://www.hawaii.gov/dhs/protection/social_services/child_welfare/

Idaho TDD: (208) 332-7205 
Toll-Free: (800) 926-2588 
http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Children/AbuseNeglect/ChildProtectionContactPhoneNumbers/tabid/475/Default.aspx

Illinois Toll-Free: (800) 252-2873
Local (toll): (217) 524-2606
http://www.state.il.us/dcfs/child/index.shtml

Indiana Toll-Free: (800) 800-5556
http://www.in.gov/dcs/protection/dfcchi.html

Iowa Toll-Free: (800) 362-2178
http://www.dhs.state.ia.us/dhs2005/dhs_homepage/children_family/abuse_reporting/child_abuse.html

Kansas Toll-Free: (800) 922-5330
http://www.srskansas.org/services/child_protective_services.htm

Kentucky Toll-Free: (877) 597-2331 
http://chfs.ky.gov/dcbs/dpp/childsafety.htm

Louisiana Toll-Free: (855) 452-5437 
http://dss.louisiana.gov/index.cfm?md=pagebuilder&tmp=home&pid=109

Maine TTY: (800) 963-9490
Toll-Free: (800) 452-1999
http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/ocfs/hotlines.htm

Maryland http://www.dhr.state.md.us/cps/report.htm
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Massachusetts Toll-Free: (800) 792-5200
http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/consumer/family-services/child-abuse-neglect/

Michigan Fax: (616) 977-1154 
  (616) 977-1158 
Toll-Free: (855) 444-3911 
http://www.michigan.gov/dhs/0,1607,7-124-5452_7119—,00.html

Minnesota http://www.dhs.state.mn.us/main/idcplg?IdcService=GET_DYNAMIC_CONVERSION&RevisionSelectionMethod=LatestReleased&dDocName=id_000152
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Mississippi Toll-Free: (800) 222-8000
Local (toll): (601) 359-4991
http://www.mdhs.state.ms.us/fcs_prot.html

Missouri Toll-Free: (800) 392-3738
http://www.dss.mo.gov/cd/rptcan.htm

Montana Toll-Free: (866) 820-5437
http://www.dphhs.mt.gov/cfsd/index.shtml

Nebraska Toll-Free: (800) 652-1999
http://www.hhs.state.ne.us/cha/chaindex.htm

Nevada Toll-Free: (800) 992-5757 
http://dcfs.state.nv.us/DCFS_ReportSuspectedChildAbuse.htm

New Hampshire Toll-Free: (800) 894-5533
Local (toll): (603) 271-6556
http://www.dhhs.state.nh.us/dcyf/cps/contact.htm

New Jersey TDD: (800) 835-5510
TTY: (800) 835-5510
Toll-Free: (877) 652-2873
http://www.state.nj.us/dcf/abuse/how/

New Mexico Toll-Free: (855) 333-7233 
http://www.cyfd.org/content/reporting-abuse-or-neglect

New York TDD: (800) 369-2437
Toll-Free: (800) 342-3720
Local (toll): (518) 474-8740
http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/cps/

North Carolina http://www.dhhs.state.nc.us/dss/cps/index.htm
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

North Dakota http://www.nd.gov/dhs/services/childfamily/cps/#reporting
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Ohio http://jfs.ohio.gov/county/cntydir.stm
Contact the county Public Children Services Agency using the list above or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Oklahoma Toll-Free: (800) 522-3511
http://www.okdhs.org/programsandservices/cps/default.htm

Oregon http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/children/abuse/cps/report.shtml
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Pennsylvania TDD: (866) 872-1677 
Toll-Free: (800) 932-0313 
http://www.dpw.state.pa.us/forchildren/childwelfareservices/calltoreportchildabuse!/index.htm

Puerto Rico Toll-Free: (800) 981-8333
Local (toll): (787) 749-1333
Spanish Information Website: http://www.gobierno.pr/GPRPortal/StandAlone/AgencyInformation.aspx?Filter=177

Rhode Island Toll-Free: (800) RI-CHILD (800-742-4453)
http://www.dcyf.ri.gov/child_welfare/index.php

South Carolina Local (toll): (803) 898-7318
http://dss.sc.gov/content/customers/protection/cps/index.aspx
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

South Dakota http://dss.sd.gov/cps/protective/reporting.asp
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Tennessee Toll-Free: (877) 237-0004
https://reportabuse.state.tn.us/

Texas Toll-Free: (800) 252-5400
https://www.dfps.state.tx.us/Child_Protection/About_Child_Protective_Services/reportChildAbuse.asp
Spanish Information Website: http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/default-sp.asp

Utah Toll-Free: (800) 678-9399
http://www.hsdcfs.utah.gov

Vermont After hours: (800) 649-5285 
http://www.dcf.state.vt.us/fsd/reporting_child_abuse

Virginia Toll-Free: (800) 552-7096
Local (toll): (804) 786-8536
http://www.dss.virginia.gov/family/cps/index.html

Washington TTY: (800) 624-6186 
Toll-Free: (800) 562-5624 
  (866) END-HARM (866-363-4276)
http://www1.dshs.wa.gov/ca/safety/abuseReport.asp?2

West Virginia Toll-Free: (800) 352-6513
http://www.wvdhhr.org/bcf/children_adult/cps/report.asp

Wisconsin http://dcf.wisconsin.gov/children/CPS/cpswimap.HTM
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.

Wyoming http://dfsweb.state.wy.us/protective-services/cps/index.html
Click on the website above for information on reporting or call Childhelp® (800-422-4453) for assistance.
Agencies and what they can provide:

American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC)
350 Poplar Avenue
CHO 3B-3406  Elmhurst, IL 60126
Phone: (630) 941-1235 Fax: (630) 359-4274 Toll-Free: (877) 402-7722
apsac@apsac.org
http://www.apsac.org
 
Center for Effective Discipline (CED)
155 West Main Street
Suite 1603  Columbus, OH 43215
Phone: (614) 221-8829Fax: (614) 221-2110
Info@StopHitting.org
http://www.stophitting.org
 
 Center for Violence and Injury Prevention (CVIP)
One Brookings Drive
Campus Box 1196  St. Louis, MO 63130  Phone: (314) 935-8129
bcvip@wustl.edu

Center to Restore Trafficked and Exploited Children (CRTEC)
P.O. Box 296
Hiawatha, IA 52233
Phone: (319) 892-0230   Fax: (319) 892-0203
info@crtec.org

 Chadwick Center For Children and Families
Children’s Hospital and Health Center
3020 Children’s Way, MC 5017
San Diego, CA 92123  Phone: (858) 966-8572

 Chapel Hill Training-Outreach Project, Inc. (CHTOP)
800 Eastowne Drive
Suite 105
Chapel Hill, NC 27514
Phone: (919) 490-5577  Fax: (919) 490-4905

 Child Abuse Prevention Network
NY
tom@child-abuse.com
http://www.child-abuse.com
 
Child AbuseWatch.NET
P.O. Box 970715    Coconut Creek, FL 33097
info@abusewatch.net
http://www.abusewatch.net/    watch.net/victim.php
 
Child Lures Prevention
5166 Shelburne Road   Shelburne, VT 05482
Phone: (802) 985-8458  Fax: (802) 985-8418
info@childluresprevention.com
http://www.childluresprevention.com/

Child Molestation Research & Prevention Institute (CMRPI)
1401 Peachtree Street
Suite 120   Atlanta, GA 30309
Phone: (404) 872-5152
contact@childmolestationprevention.org
http://www.childmolestationprevention.org

Child Safe
St. Vincent’s Center/Catholic Charities
2600 Pot Spring Road
Timonium, MD 21093  Phone: (410) 252-4000
childsafe@catholiccharities-md.org
http://www.childsafeeducation.com

  Child Welfare Information Gateway
Children’s Bureau/ACYF
1250 Maryland Avenue, SW — Eighth Floor
Washington, DC 20024
Fax: (703) 225-2357
Toll-Free: (800) 394-3366
info@childwelfare.gov
http://www.childwelfare.gov

 

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Domestic Violence Resourses

http://www.documenttheabuse.com/
http://www.documenttheabuse.com/EAAProducts.html
http://www.documenttheabuse.com/LethalRelationship.html
http://www.susanmurphy-milano.com/
http://www.safehorizon.org/
http://www.womenslaw.org/
http://www.thehotline.org/
http://www.ncvc.org
http://www.nrcdv.org/
http://www.ncadv.org/
http://loveisnotabuse.com
https://www.facebook.com/AMPPUSA
www.saferelationshipsmagazine.com
https://www.facebook.com/MamaBearsDvSurvivorsFightingForTheirKids

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